Fun With Freakonomics *Think Like a Freak*

November 24, 2015

Think Like A Freak is highly entertaining and informative like the earlier Freakonmics books.

It contains some very useful GEMS.

I especially liked the Incentives 101 summary on page 135.

Number 5 is so ….

5. Never, ever think that people will do something just because it is the “right” thing to do.

Incentives 101

ThinkLikeAFreakIncentives101

More

I had the pleasure of attending a talk by Steven Levitt at UBC a few years back when “Think Like A Freak” came out. I’m glad I’ve finally read the book.


Important Reading *A Bigger Prize* by Margaret Heffernan

November 21, 2015

Margaret Heffernan’s recent book on the topic of Competition is an important read. Her view of competition will really mess with your current views. Guaranteed. It is worth the effort.

Yes that means that A Bigger Prize: How We Can Do Better than the Competition is tough going. The final paragraph of Harvey Schachter’s great review is spot on.

She goes on and on, not just listing the damages she ascribes to competition but also indicating why the alternative, collaboration, is preferred. It’s sobering reading, well researched and illuminating in its examples and scope.
Harvey Schachter – Globe & Mail

Links


So Much Fun — The Secrets of The Immortal Nicholas Flamel

November 18, 2015

My current “book crush” in the teen fantasy genre is Michael Scott’s “The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel series.

This is so much fun. I’ve been mixing the audio and print. Both are great.

Almost as much fun as 39 Clues and Charlie Bone – Children of the Red King.


*Thank You* Jeffrey Pfeffer –Leadership BS is Awesome!!!

November 16, 2015

“Thank You” Jeffrey Pfeffer.
I love Leadership BS! I’ve already gifted a few copies. It’s that good.

Yes, it is sad, sobering, and Machiavellian as most of the reviews I’ve read say.

So What! It’s one of the few books that gives advice based on “Reality”. It’s important to note that leaders are not perfect and that bad behavior is more common than we’d like to admit. Pay attention and take care of yourself.

So Many Gems

My favorite is on page 173

“… relying on the good behavior and positive sentiments of work organizations for your career well being is singularly foolish”

Getting A Raise

In Chapter 7 “Take Care of Yourself” Pfeffer gives great advice on asking for a raise. Think “What can you do for the organization in the future?” — the organization does not care what you’ve done in the past. Yes it’s harsh advice. But is true and choosing to ignore this reality is a bad plan. Make sure you firmly put yourself in the organizations future plans, then you are “needed”. Talk about what you’re going to do. Use your past successes to support your story for your future.

Books For Experiential Learning

I’ve found that in teaching experiential workshops, like e@UBC’s Lean LaunchPads, our students are more exposed to “Reality”. Thus we need more books to support what they find in their research. We need more leadership books that have their roots in what people actually do versus what we want them to do. For example, there is a section where Mentorship goes sideways in this book. Priceless.


Lifting Your Spirit – Readings Inspired By This Summers Workshops

November 15, 2015

I’ve had some very interesting reads which were inspired by this summers spiritual workshops at the SCRH.

Interconnectedness of All Things

The first is a reminder of a great kids book on the inter-connected-ness of all things titled You Are Stardust.

* The water in your sink once quenched the thirst of dinosaurs;
* with every sneeze, wind blasts out of your nose faster than a cheetah’s sprint;
* the electricity that powers every thought in your brain is stronger than lightning.

It’s at my local library. Guessing it’s at yours too.

Young Tibetans

That is — they’re much younger than the Dalai Lama. «smile»

The “young” Tibetan Monks Yongey Mingyur Rinpoche (YMR) and Dzongsar Jamyang Khyentse Rinpoche (DJKR) have both written “Introductory Buddhist” books.

The new thing they bring to these topics is that they’ve travelled in the “West” for a long time and know us, the English language, and Western Science better than their elders. Their choices of words and examples are very good. These books are “readable”.

If you’re wanting to get a better view of Tibetan Buddhism then I highly recommend the following introductory books.

  • DJKR’s “What Makes You Not a Buddhist”
  • YMR’s “The Joy of Living” & “Joyful Wisdom”

If you’re looking for a practical book about dealing with your anxiety then “YMR’s — Joyful Wisdom” is the one for you.

DJK WhatMakesYouNotBuddhist

Yonge TheJoyOfLiving IMG 0855

For The Curious – “What Makes You a Buddhist?”

Here is the answer via an excerpt from DJKR’s “What Makes You Not a Buddhist”

DJK FourViews